MyDesert.com has an interview up with WWE World Heavyweight Champion CM Punk. Here are some of the highlights.

On the advantages of the live WWE house show events:
“We’re saddled with constraints when on television ? the biggest one being time and commercials breaks,? he said. ?But when you’re live, you don’t worry about that, especially the crowd in the first five rows. You can get personal with them and draw them into the action.”

On what the “CM” in CM Punk stands for:
“The most commonly given answer is ?Chick Magnet. It clearly stands for champion material.”

On his dream opponent in the ring:
“For a long period of time, Harley Race was the best wrestler in world. Talk about a guy who back then, even now, he just gets it. He knew what his job was and he went out and did it. He’s probably the toughest wrestler who ever lived. I’m also good friends with him. He’s a sweetheart. But yeah, if I could pick one guy, it’d be Harley. He’s someone I want to wrestle and never will wrestle. I think he was just like the best wrestler in the world for almost a decade.”

His thoughts on wrestling web sites and rumors online:
“I don’t really peruse the wrestling Web sites. If you believe all the bad stuff, the rumors, it kinda tends to bring you down. I think the obvious one is I’m always in trouble and I’m always in the dog house. I always get a kick out of that one. I think that’s been constant for three years now; (that) I’m in trouble, I pissed somebody off.”

On the passing of Mitsuharu Misawa:
“I was pretty devastated. I don’t think I could have been a bigger fan of the guy. I was a big fan of all the All Japan wrestlers from the ’80s and ’90s. I’m a huge Jumbo Tsuruta fan, always got a kick out of Giant Baba … all the All Japan guys from the ’90s. I don?t know if I can say I grew up watching, like, Roddy Piper, but those are definite – just the style they portrayed in Japanese wrestling was followed over in Japan so rapidly. It just made me a huge fan of the styles and the guys. (Misawa’s) one of the true legends of the sport. Being 46 years old, he obviously died way too early.”

To check out the full interview, click here.